National Anthropological Archives and Human Studies Film Archives


PHOTOGRAPHS OF DRAWINGS BY SQUINT EYE

The collection consists of negatives, prints, and colored slides. The drawings are from a notebook used by a Cheyenne artist. The original drawings are in the archives.

DATE: No date

QUANTITY: 132 items

ARRANGEMENT: Unarranged

FINDING AID: None

CALL NUMBER: Photo Lot 79-24

E. KENNETH STABLER COLLECTION OF JESSE WALTER FEWKES PHOTOGRAPHS

From 1895 to 1928, J. Walter Fewkes was a Bureau of American Ethnology archeologist. Toward the end of his career, he served as BAE chief. His field work was largely in the Southwest, Mexico, and the West Indies. Stabler was Fewkes' nephew by marriage. He donated the collection of miscellaneous prints and lantern slides in 1968. The photographers are generally unidentified. Fewkes may have taken some photographs but probably not most.

The prints are of southwestern ruins and artifacts and West Indian and/or Mexican towns and artifacts. Included are views tentatively identified as San Juan, Puerto Rico; Wukoki Ruin, Arizona, and the Sitgreaves Ruin, Arizona. There are also photographs of a broken ladle (USNM catalog 155,771) and cooking pot (USNM catalog 315,806) from Sikyatki and a stone axe from Awatobi (USNM catalog 156,062).

The lantern slides, which form the bulk, are from photographs, maps, and drawings. Included are views of Zuni ceremonies; a Hopi town; the Cathedral of Guadalupe, Juarez, Mexico; old world monoliths; an exhibit of an Easter Island statue; Oak Creek, Arizona; Mushroom Ruin, Colorado; Casa Grande, Arizona; Wukoki Ruin, Arizona; Philae, Egypt; and Sian-fu, China, the latter including a Nestorian monument. A series of photographs relates to coral islands and atoll formation, both of which interested Fewkes before he became an anthropologist.

See NAA Manuscript 4408 for Fewkes' field notes, and the Subject and Geographic File of photographic negatives, Jesse Walter Fewkes Material Relating to Mesa Verde, Jesse Walter Fewkes Negatives, and NAA Manuscript 4321 for additional Fewkes photographs.

DATES: No date

QUANTITY: ca. 171 items

ARRANGEMENT: Unarranged

FINDING AID: None

CALL NUMBER: Photo Lot 1

LANTERN SLIDE COLLECTION OF JOSEPH STANLEY-BROWN

In 1891, the United States treasury secretary sent Joseph Stanley-Brown, formerly President James Garfield's private, to investigate the Prybilof Islands seal industry. The industry had caused a controversy between the United States and Great Britain. In 1892, after the matter was submitted to arbitration, Stanley-Brown was a United States expert witness before a tribunal in Paris. He was later with the North American Commercial Company's government-regulated sealing activities on the Prybilofs and Unalaska. Eventually, he was involved with several railroad companies throughout the United States and Mexico.

Most slides relate to the seal industry and Alaska. There are views of seal hunting, towns, land forms, wildlife, fishing industry, Eskimos, and Aleuts. There are also slides of related maps and charts. A few slides show Washington, D.C., public buildings (including the Smithsonian Institution); Northwest Coast villages; American Southwest or Mexico views; and the Yukon gold rush. Few items bear captions. Many are damaged.

Related photographic prints are in the BAE-USNM Photographs of American Indians and Other Subjects and the Department of Anthropology Division of Ethnology Manuscript and Pamphlet File.

DATES: Many probably 1890s

QUANTITY: ca. 400 slides

ARRANGEMENT: Unarranged

FINDING AIDS: None

CALL NUMBER: Photo Lot 54

STEREOGRAPH OF Charles Bird King PORTRAITS OF INDIANS IN THE PICTURE GALLERY AT THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

The stereograph, which was distributed by Langenheim, Lloyd, and Company, is of Indian portraits that hung in the Smithsonian Institution. They were nearly all destroyed as the result of a fire in the Smithsonian "Castle" in 1865The individual portraits are not clearly shown in the stereograph.

DATE: Copyright 1858

QUANTITY: 1 print

CALL NUMBER: Photo Lot 80-47

RICHARD EDWIN STEARNS (1902-1969) PHOTOGRAPHS

Richard E. Stearns was an amateur archeologist active in Maryland. Beginning around 1918 and continuing almost until his death, he was active in field work and publication; and, beginning in the 1930s, he was the curator of the Natural History Society of Maryland. His special interest was the tidewater area of Maryland where he surveyed along rivers to locate village sites. He also carried out excavations, the most notable being at Cononwingo, a large village site on the Susquehanna River. He also worked in more distant areas, especially in Florida.

Stearns was known for his photographs of sites and specimens. His collection largely includes photographic negatives and prints, but there are also cartographic materials and drawings. Included are materials of Sussex County in Delaware; the District of Columbia; Bay, Collier, Flagler, Franklin, St. John's, St. Lucie, and Volusia counties in Florida; Glynn County in Georgia; Anne Arundel, Baltimore,

Calvert, Cecil, Charles, Frederick, Harford, Howard, Kent, Montgomery, Prince Georges, Queen Anne's, and St. Mary's counties in Maryland; Horry County in South Carolina; and Fairfax, Loudon, and Page counties in Virginia.

The collection became United States National Museum accessions 188,174; 191,329; and 247,561. There are additional cartographic materials in the USNM registrar's files. Further cartographic material is among the maps described as part of the Department of Anthropology's records. There are also additional photographs by Stearns, including some he made in connection with William B. Marye's work on Indian bridges and trails in Maryland and nearby states. Marye's material is in the series of Numbered Manuscripts.

DATES: 1930s-1960s

QUANTITY: ca. 1200 items

ARRANGEMENT: The material is imperfectly arranged. It includes an album and related material concerning sites in Florida, a file arranged by state, an album mostly with photographs taken in Maryland but also some taken in the District of Columbia and in Virginia, and a miscellany.

FINDING AID: None

CALL NUMBER: Photo Lot 73-40

MICHAEL F. STELTENKAMP, S.J., PHOTOGRAPHS

The black-and-white prints show Lucy Looks Twice (1907-1978), daughter of the Oglala Dakota Black Elk, and Lucy's daughter Norma Regina (1940-1978).

DATE: 1975

QUANTITY: 2 prints

CALL NUMBER: Photo Lot 95-18

STEREOGRAPHIC NEGATIVES OF SKULLS

The material relates to lot 73-26C.

DATES: Probably late 1870s or 1880s

QUANTITY: Uncounted

ARRANGEMENT: Unarranged

FINDING AID: None

CALL NUMBER: Photo Lot 73-26D.

STEREOGRAPH OF AN INDIAN HUNTER

The image shows a man armed with a bow and arrow. The photographer is unidentified.

DATE: No date

QUANTITY: 1 stereograph

CALL NUMBER: Photo Lot 89-27

STEREOGRAPHS OF NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS

Included are Arikara, Mandan, Hidatsa, and Dakota subjects. The Keystone View Company, Stanley J. Morrow, Charles R. Savage, and Joel E. Whitney distributed some images.

DATES: No date

QUANTITY: 50 stereographs

ARRANGEMENT: By tribe

FINDING AID: None

CALL NUMBER: Photo Lot 140

STEVENSON, MATILDA COXE (1850-1915), Papers

See the next entry for a brief note on Matilda Coxe Stevenson's career.

Many of Stevenson's scientific notes are in the series of Numbered Manuscripts. Her photographs are in several collections. This particular set are papers handled by her executor. It consists of a miscellany of letters, notes, legal documents, cartographic materials, genealogical materials, photographs, newspaper clippings, other printed material, and other types of documents. Although the collection largely concerns Stevenson, it also includes small quantities of material of her husband, James Stevenson, and members of her family, especially her father, Alexander H. Evans, a Washington, D.C., attorney.

Many documents of this collection concern Stevenson's field work among the Pueblo Indians (some of it was formerly part of the J.P. Harrington collection) and other official duties with the Smithsonian. Some relate to her activities with the World's Columbian Exposition and the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. A few concern her membership in scientific organizations (though seemingly only printed materials relate to the Women's Anthropological Society of America). Still other documents are personal, and some are mementoes, especially of James Stevenson. A significant group of documents concern Matilda Coxe Stevenson's friendly and, later, difficult relations with Clara True.

The photographic material includes items of ethnographic interest, but it consists largely of portraits of James and Matilda Coxe Stevenson and Mrs. Stevenson's relatives. Also included are images in albums apparently gathered by Stevenson as a collector. They include likenesses of Kit Carson, Charles Darwin, Charles Dickens, Ferdinand V. Hayden, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and William Tecumseh Sher portraits with unidentified subjects, probably actors and actresses.

Correspondents include Larz Anderson, Rachel Foster Avery, Spencer F. Baird, John G. Bourke, Edward S. Curtis, William B. Douglass, Mary K. Eagle, Mary Wright Gill, George Brown Goode, Frederick W. Hodge, Oliver Wendell Holmes, William Henry Holmes, W.T. Hornaday, Joseph Leidy, Anita Newcomb McGee, Virginia C. Meredith, A.N. Moseley, Sophie A. Nordhoff-Jung, Henry L. Pollard, John Wesley Powell, Frederic W. Putnam, Herman Schweizer, William Tecumseh Sherman, Clara True, Edward Burnett Tylor, and Charles Doolittle Walcott.

DATES: ca. 1801-1914

QUANTITY: ca. 1.5 linear meters (ca. 5 linear feet)

ARRANGEMENT: (1) Correspondence with the Smithsonian Institution, 1887-1914; (2) correspondence with colleagues, friends, and professional societies, 1892-1910; (3) material related to personal business (correspondence, records, and receipts), 1906-1914; (4) general correspondence with colleagues, friends, and acquaintances, 1877-1915; (5) correspondence relating to Matilda Coxe Stevenson or James Stevenson, 1871-1910; (6) family correspondence and papers, 1801; (7) clippings and miscellaneous personal items, 1856-1914; (8) miscellaneous ethnographic notes, n.d.; (9) library items; (10) photographs and portraits of family and friends, n.d.; (11) historical, ethnographic, and miscellaneous photographs, n.d.; (12) maps of New Mexican pueblos by William B. Douglass; (13) Southwest research manuscripts and notes formerly in the J.P. Harrington collection (Zuni, Tewa, Tiwa, and Zuni).

FINDING AID: Box list

CALL NUMBER: Manuscript 4689

MATILDA COXE STEVENSON (1850-1915) PHOTOGRAPHS

Matilda Coxe Stevenson (born Matilda Coxe Evans) was the wife of James Stevenson, a geologist and John Wesley Powell's executive officer with the United States Geological Survey and the Bureau of American Ethnology. Accompanying her husband on geological explorations, she met Ute and Navaho Indians and became so interested in them that she devoted the rest of her life to ethnology. In 1879, she joined her husband on the first BAE field expedition to the Southwest. After that, her focus became fixed on the region, especially on Pueblo cultures. After James Stevenson died in 1888, she became a regular BAE staff member and continued making trips to the Southwest. She was particularly interested in the lives of Indian women and especially studied domestic and ritual life. Stevenson also made extensive ethnological collections for the Smithsonian.

The photographic negatives in this collection are probably by Stevenson herself (although at times she traveled with a female companion who took photographs). The photographs include views made at Cochiti, Hopi, Jemez, San Ildefonso, Santa Clara, Santo Domingo, and Zuni. There are also a few images of Navahos and Utes.

DATES: 1896-1904 (most ca. 1904)

QUANTITY: ca. 1100 negatives plus copy prints

ARRANGEMENT: Numerical by lot and item numbers

FINDING AID: List

CALL NUMBER: Photo Lot 23


Guide to the Collections of the National Anthropological Archives