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Member organizations of the Ornithological Council

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State permit policies & procedures

Back to US State index

Tennessee

Last updated December 2014

Website

    Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency
    http://www.tennessee.gov/twra/

Contacts

    State Ornithologist
    Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency
    Ellington Agricultural Center, P.O. Box 40747
    Nashville, TN 37204
    Phone: (615) 781-6610
    Fax: (615) 781-6654

Is a permit needed for banding?

Yes! A state permit is needed for banding and all other markers including transmitters and geolocators. A state permit is also needed for taking blood and feathers.

Permit application forms

  • Application Form - Available here or from the agency website
  • Renewal - same form

  • Threatened and Endangered - same form

  • Salvage - same form

State lands

Anyone wishing to collect biological or geological materials, or air or water samples, or install research equipment on State Park or Designated State Natural Area land must obtain a scientific research and collecting permit from the Tennessee Division of Natural Areas.

See http://tennessee.gov/environment/permits/parkcoll.shtml for additional information and
application forms

Prior notice

Check permit conditions. Even if not expressly required to do so, you should always contact the manager of that particular state land unit or with the owner of private land before your arrival. You want to be aware of the hunting seasons, and, of course want to be sure that your activities will not interfere with the activities of that park, wildlife management area, or other state land unit, and that your activities will not adversely affect public use of the land or with the activities of private landowners.

Policies

Tennesse Code Annotated (Statute)

70-2-213. Permits for scientific purposes — Reports required — Penalty for violation. —
(a)  The executive director has the power, at the executive director's discretion, to grant permission, under the executive director's seal, to any reliable person to take, capture and transport in Tennessee, wild birds, and nests and eggs of wild birds, and wild animals and fish, when taken and used for purely scientific purposes. The permit so issued shall continue in force for one (1) year after the date of issue and shall specify the number of any species to be taken under the permit.

(b)  Each person receiving a permit under the provisions of this section shall report to the wildlife resources agency on blanks furnished by it, at or before the expiration of such permit, the number and disposition of the collections made under the permit.

(c)  Any person taking any wildlife in violation of the provisions of this section, or of the permit held by that person, shall be, upon conviction, fined not less than twenty-five dollars ($25.00) nor more than one hundred dollars ($100) and the permit held by that person shall become void.